The Cage Book 1 Review

“When Cora Mason wakes in a desert, she doesn’t know where she is or who put her there. As she explores, she finds an impossible mix of environments—tundra next to desert, farm next to jungle, and a strangely empty town cobbled together from different cultures—all watched over by eerie black windows. And she isn’t alone.

Four other teenagers have also been taken: a beautiful model, a tattooed smuggler, a secretive genius, and an army brat who seems to know too much about Cora’s past. None of them have a clue as to what happened, and all of them have secrets. As the unlikely group struggles for leadership, they slowly start to trust each other. But when their mysterious jailer—a handsome young guard called Cassian—appears, they realize that their captivity is more terrifying than they could ever imagine: Their captors aren’t from Earth. And they have taken the five teenagers for an otherworldly zoo—where the exhibits are humans.

As a forbidden attraction develops between Cora and Cassian, she realizes that her best chance of escape might be in the arms of her own jailer—though that would mean leaving the others behind. Can Cora manage to save herself and her companions? And if so . . . what world lies beyond the walls of their cage?”

summary by Goodreads

The Cage is the first book in a trilogy by Megan Shepherd. I started reading it because my friend recommended it, saying it is one of her favorite series. It was interesting and intriguing to say the least. There are a lot of elements to the plot which keeps it interesting. There is a history between two of the main characters Cora and Lucky which drew most of my attention and what I kept thinking about. The main storyline is that this group of teenagers are kidnapped and taken to another world, where there are many different species of aliens. I applaud Shepherd for creating a vast and intricate world different from everything I have seen before. The alien species “in charge” are called the Kindred who are like a superior human species. The plot keeps you hooked and keeps you guessing which keeps you reading.

I give The Cage 4/5 stars and I will continue to read and review the second book (The Hunt) and the third book (The Gauntlet).

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Looking For Alaska -John Green

I just finished Looking For Alaska for the second time. I read in less than 24 hours, and when I wasn’t reading I was thinking. This book has basically consumed my thoughts for the past day.  There are many great quotes and symbolism that I didn’t notice the first time. One of the most notable was “How do you get out of the labyrinth of suffering?” (John Green). This question consumed Alaska and is a reoccurring theme in the story.

The first time I read Looking For Alaska, my focus was not on the symbolism and the questions that were raised while reading, instead it was focused the smoking and the drinking. However, while there is still a lot of smoking and drinking, it done symbolically and has a deeper meaning. Well it has a deeper meaning for Alaska….

“Y’all smoke to enjoy it. I smoke to die.”

As you can probably tell Alaska is one of those characters that is as deep and mysterious as the ocean. She is impulsive, random, and spontaneous. She has a “Life Library” of all the books she wants to read, and can quote authors and poets without hesitation. She is one of those characters that makes you wish you were fictional just so you can know her and be like her. But she was broken, hurting, and full of guilt. (SPOILER) And like most characters like her, she meant an unfortunate ending, because the way I see it people that amazing, that unique are too good for this world. As Pudge said…

“If people were rain,
I was drizzle
and she was a hurricane.”

Everyone is Weird in Their Own Way

Today I overheard someone saying that they don’t care if people think their weird or don’t like them because their friends think their awesome. That got me thinking, everyone is weird and it’s a good thing. I would say that my friends and I are pretty weird, and I never really thought that other people could be as weird as us. But they are. I don’t mean it in a bad way, but most people seem to accept the fact that their different and they don’t want to be normal. But what is the definition of normal? According to Dictionary.com the definition of normal is “conforming to the standard or the common type; usual; not abnormal; regular; natural.” So what is considered normal? This is a difficult question to answer because it varies from person to person. Normal is one of those words that means something different to each person. When people say they like being weird do they really mean they like being normal? Is being weird considered normal? Is there even such thing as being normal?

(Note: This is my own opinion. It’s just a thought I had and is something to think about.)

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